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Familiar Diversions

I'm a librarian who loves anime, manga, and reading a wide variety of genres.

Currently reading

Who?
Algis Budrys
Alliance In Blood
Ariel Tachna
Progress: 86/210 pages
To Say Nothing of the Dog: Or How We Found the Bishop's Bird Stump at Last
Connie Willis, Recorded Books LLC, Steven Crossley
The Invisible Orientation: An Introduction to Asexuality
Julie Sondra Decker
The Mystic Marriage
Heather Rose Jones
Progress: 302/426 pages
Ichi-F: A Worker's Graphic Memoir of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant
Kazuto Tatsuta
Progress: 448/553 pages
Fluency
Jennifer Foehner Wells
Progress: 58/367 pages
Dragon Drive, Volume 1 - Ken-ichi Sakura Reiji Ozora doesn't play video games because there's never been a video game that he's really gotten hooked on. That doesn't stop his friend Maiko from forcing him to try a new game called Dragon Drive. Each player is given a mobile and a card with dragon on it that matches the player's physical abilities (a machine computes your stats and spits out the card). Then, when you're in the virtual world, you fight other players and their dragons with your own dragon - your dragon levels up as it beats other dragons. At least, that's how it's all supposed to work, but Reiji's dragon is pathetic. The first time he sees it, it's asleep, and it has a fighting ability of zero. However, this is a game-based shonen manga, so of course things are not as bad as they seem. His dragon is tougher than its stats indicate (which is impossible, according to the game designers), but Reiji doesn't seem to have good control over it yet. He'd better learn quickly, though, because all the toughest players are starting to notice him, as are some of the people in charge of the game.This series shows some definite promise, so I'll be getting more volumes once my library orders them. I'm hoping that future volumes allow for Reiji and his dragon, Chibi, to develop a decent friendship, rather than just focusing on the fighting, but, considering that this is a shonen manga, I'm guessing Chibi will mostly just be a mysterious and occasionally funny tool for battle, rather than a friend with a gradually developing and evolving personality.If this game actually existed in real life in the same way it does in the manga, I guarantee people would be lined up for days to play it. I know I would. That aspect is part of what makes this manga fun. You get to imagine what it would be like having a virtual dragon that's matched specifically to your stats. The dragons themselves are also interesting. There's a bit of humor, too, but that aspect won't be enough to keep me reading this series. I'm interested to see if Sakura will be able to improve this series and continue to make it appealing beyond the things I just mentioned, or if it will stagnate.(Original review, with read-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)