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Familiar Diversions

I'm a librarian who loves anime, manga, and reading a wide variety of genres.

Currently reading

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Squirrel Meets World
Abigail Revasch, Shannon Hale, Dean Hale, Tara Sands, Listening Library
Progress: 67/473 minutes
The Mystic Marriage
Heather Rose Jones
Progress: 302/426 pages
Ichi-F: A Worker's Graphic Memoir of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant
Kazuto Tatsuta
Progress: 58/553 pages
The Naked Sun
Isaac Asimov
Progress: 20/187 pages
50 Girls 50 and Other Stories
Al Williamson, Frank Frazetta, Gary Groth
Fluency
Jennifer Foehner Wells
Progress: 58/367 pages
The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet: A Novel
Becky Chambers
Progress: 148/441 pages
The Count of Monte Cristo
Alexandre Dumas, Bill Homewood, Naxos AudioBooks
Progress: 667/3165 minutes
A Matter of Oaths
Helen S. Wright
Progress: 101/277 pages
Medical School for Everyone: Grand Rounds Cases
Professor Roy Benaroch, The Great Courses, The Great Courses
Progress: 34/725 minutes
The Warrior's Apprentice (Vorkosigan Saga, #2) - Lois McMaster Bujold It looks like I've found another series to glom onto – this book was lots of fun, and I can't wait to read more, particularly more about Miles.I absolutely loved Miles. He had an insane amount of energy and drive. He was highly intelligent and usually had a good grasp of his strengths and weaknesses. However, he wasn't superhuman, and the way people reacted to him could still affect him. He hated that so many people, even some of his own family members, doubted he'd be able to accomplish much within Barrayaran society, and it hurt when he couldn't make his father and grandfather proud by qualifying for military service. Just about every stranger who met him took one look at him and assumed he must be a mutant, due to the effect his badly healed bones had on his posture.Although Miles failed the physical portion of his qualifying exam at the beginning of the book, he proved himself to be 100% awesome over and over again throughout the rest of the story. Faced with more than any one person could possibly deal with, he delegated work and projected an aura of confidence and control. His “lie first, figure out how to deal with the consequences later” policy simultaneously saved him and got him into more trouble. It was the story equivalent of watching someone run very fast down a flight of stairs – exciting, a little horrifying in its potential for massive failure, and fast-paced enough that it was sometimes hard to keep track of the lies and how Miles was managing to keep everything together.The one thing I found frustrating about Miles was his crush on Elena. I admit, I was so nervous about how things would go between the two of them that I looked up spoilers. Even without the spoilers, it wasn't hard to figure out that Elena was falling in love with someone else, so my biggest worry was how Miles would react once she rejected him. As sharp as Miles was when dealing with all the “Dendarii Mercenaries” stuff, he seemed to miss everything where Elena was concerned – it was sometimes hard to remember that he was only 17, so I suppose that served as a reminder.The book's biggest weakness, I think, was its world-building. It sometimes felt like world details were being made up as needed, in much the same way Miles lied in the spur of the moment and then made the lies fit together later on. There were quite a few times when I wasn't really sure what was going on and had to just allow my love for Miles to carry me along. Because I did love Miles so much, any confusion on my part mostly didn't bother me.I definitely plan on reading more of this series. I want more hyperactive, clever, poker-faced, lying Miles, and I'm also interested, to a lesser degree, in Miles' parents. The Mountains of Mourning, chronologically the book (novella?) right after The Warrior's Apprentice, will probably be what I read next. Then I'll need to decide whether to buy more of the series in e-book form or in print. I have a feeling I'll be getting the e-books first (yes, Baen won me over) and then keeping an eye out for used print copies. More and more of my reading seems to be done on my e-reader anymore, but I'd like to have print copies around as "back-ups." (Original review, with read-alikes and watch-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)